Project Joseph Training – April 29 2017


MEN 25+ IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF MIAMI: COME, LEARN ABOUT PROJECT JOSEPH AND HOW TO HELP MEN IN CRISIS PREGNANCY.

Official Event Link

To learn more visit www.projectjoseph.org

– You can also RSVP on Facebook –

UPDATES

A huge THANK YOU to the Archdiocese of Miami for including the announcement of the workshop in the Pastoral Bulletin of April, and to the Knights of Columbus of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Monroe County for promoting the workshop.

We look forward to prepare more men so that they be ready to mentor dads in the Archdiocese of Miami’s 5 Pregnancy Help Centers.

 

Published in: on March 20, 2017 at 2:31 PM  Leave a Comment  

DOES MAN HAVE MORAL RIGHTS OR COINCIDENTAL RIGHTS?


We have some major moral issues on the table that ethics cannot ignore.  We pose them here in question form to allow each reader to arrive at his or her own conclusions, always guided by a well-formed conscience rather than what’s simply comfortable.

1. Is it moral to strip 24 million people of affordable healthcare?

  • Are there alternatives that can help the economy without doing harm to the voiceless?

2. The speculation is that the current government will defund Planned Parenthood for one year.

  • Is this enough to protect the right to be born?  If not, what makes this a moral gesture?

3. There are individuals in government who are seriously considering defunding Meals on Wheels. If that were to happen, 2.4 million senior citizens would lose the one healthy meal they eat.

  • How can we morally justify taking a food resource away from those who cannot buy food?

4. In the Old Testament God delivered the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt, and led them to a promised land where there were already people. In the New Testament, Jesus says, “I was a stranger and you took me in.”  In both situations, the moral option being presented is openness to those who are seeking sanctuary. 

  • Could the people of that time deny sanctuary to the Jews and justify themselves before God?
  • Can we offer God a strong moral reason for denying sanctuary to refugees?
  • Can we say, with certain honesty, that foreign refugees pose a greater threat to human life than those who sell and purchase guns illegally or those involved in drug trafficking and human trafficking?

5. Assisted suicide and direct euthanasia are legal in some countries and being considered in the United States. The argument is that persons whose quality of life fails to meet certain criteria are better off dead.  Even atheists must ask themselves how can one ethically and morally support the taking of a life that is not a direct threat to our safety or that of our family?

  • Who decides the criteria for euthanasia?
  • Are the criteria arbitrary?
  • In that case, is human life an arbitrary coincidence?
  • If man is an accident of nature, how can he claim natural and moral rights?

If I had to face God’s judgement today, can I justify my position and my silence on any of these issues? 

St. Thomas Aquinas reminds us that he who sees sin and remains quiet is as guilty as the person committing the sinful act.

Published in: on March 17, 2017 at 12:32 PM  Leave a Comment  

Do you dare to “Entrust your life”


Many people look at St. Francis of Assisi as someone to be admired, but too difficult to follow.  We often hear, “St. Francis was a saint; I’m not.”  That’s the point.  St. Francis was not born a saint.  He grew physically, emotionally, intellectually and spiritually.  He became a saint through his efforts and the help of Grace.

Today, the Franciscans of Life seek only one thing.  As the psalmist said, “One thing I ask of the Lord; this I seek: To dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze on the Lord’s beauty, to visit his temple,” (Psalm 27:4).

We’re a brotherhood of married (Extern Brothers) and celibate men (Regular Brothers) that seeks to recover the original way of life of the early Franciscan family, both the friars and the secular penitents. 

Regular Brothers vow obedience, poverty, and chastity.  We live in a community house.  We are profession-of-vowsconsecrated to the Immaculate and we make a fourth vow, to proclaim the Gospel of Life.  Regular Brothers comes from the Latin “regula,” those who live in brotherhood guided by a rule of life.

We consecrate ourselves to live in the “house of the Lord” all the days of our lives.  Every brother crucifies himself next to Christ calling out to his Redeemer, “Remember me . . . “(Luke 23:42). 

Ancient rabbis taught that, after the coming of the Messiah, all sacrifices would cease except the Todah (the perfect sacrifice of thanksgiving), which would never cease to be offered throughout all eternity.  The sacrifice of the cross is the Todah.  Christ’s blood can roll backwards to the first sinner and forward to the last.

Christ_and_Francis“You cannot glory; that, however, in which we may glory is in our infirmities, and in bearing daily the holy cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (Admonitions V, St. Francis of Assisi).

Like the “Good Thief”, St. Dismas, every Regular Brother entrusts his eternal life to the perfect sacrifice offered by Christ yesterday, today and tomorrow.  The brother consecrates himself to live the Gospel living the Rule that St. Francis gave the Brothers and Sisters of Penance as our Constitutions explain it for us.

We strive to live the Gospel in an intense life of prayer, penancelogo_of_the_ffv, and poverty. We freely exercise our ministry to the voiceless, paying special attention to the preborn child and his family, the chronically and terminally ill and their families and caregivers, and the immigrant poor. (Constitutions, Part II, Chap one, Parr 1).   http://www.franciscansoflife.org/Constitutiones.pdf  

The Regular Brothers day has a fluid structure, not unlike that of a Benedictine day, but in a smaller family unit which is by its very nature very informal.  The vows are a means to an end.  We vow to strive, with the help of Grace, to live the virtues of obedience, poverty and chastity in the manner that St. Francis lived.

Our effort is sustained by the common recitation of the Divine Office (Liturgy of the Hours), Lectio Archbishop Thomas Wenski celebrates Mass for Nascent LifeDivina, spiritual reading, silent prayer in solitude, keeping a log of our faults (the Culpa) and keeping a journal of God’s activity in our lives.  Community worship, prayer, Eucharistic adoration, meals, recreation and apostolate are essential to the primitive Franciscan life. 

Discipline is an essential element of our life.  Every night, we proclaim our faults before our brothers and open our hearts and minds to hear and heed whatever correction they may offer in charity. 

Blessed is the servant who bears discipline, accusation, and blame from others as patiently as if they came from himself. Blessed is the servant who, when reproved, mildly submits, modestly obeys, humbly confesses, and willingly satisfies. Blessed is the servant who is not prompt to excuse himself and who humbly bears shame and reproof for sin when he is without fault, (Admonition 23)clock

We make proper use of the time that God has given us, with full knowledge that only God is the Lord of Time, not man.  Therefore, time is not man’s property to waste. 

St. Francis taught the first-generation Franciscans that silence is a necessary part of our way of life.  While we do not observe a strict silence as do Cistercians, we do observe exterior silence to achieve interior silence.

“Blessed is that servant who does not speak through hope of reward and who does not manifest everything and is not ‘hasty to speak,’ but who wisely foresees what he ought to say and answer,” (Admonition 22).wp_20150118_016

Finally, fasting and abstinence on Wednesdays and Fridays are essential to the way that we live and to the discipline in which we need strength to grow in virtue. 

“Living this Rule transforms us in, with, and for, the Love of God so that we, in humble ways, begin to transform our world by serving as the voice of the voiceless and offering penance for those who do homeless mothernot do penance. A penitential life resounds a constant invitation to prayer and self-mastery

 Prayer, fasting, abstinence, temperance, and a solid, family based Christian response to others drive all our daily activities in the home, fraternity and the world,” (Constitutions, Part II, Chap Six, Parr 49).

 As Jesus said to the first disciples, “Come and see.”  http://franciscansoflife.org/

An installment of the life of the Extern Franciscan of Life will soon be available.  Check in with us as often as possible so that you don’t miss it.

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Help us extend our apostolate.  Visit our  home page to donate through PayPal.  God Bless you!

 

Published in: on March 8, 2017 at 3:34 PM  Leave a Comment  

David and John


How-The-Human-Nervous-System-WorksDuring Lent, many of us agonize over what we should sacrifice during this holy period in preparation for the celebration of Easter.  Chocolate seems to be the most common “expiatory lamb.”

I’ve always wondered how giving up chocolate is a real penance.  I realize that for some people, chocolate is addictive, as is smoking for others.  But is the idea of penance to make ourselves miserable for misery’s sake or is the idea of penance to offer God something in atonement for our sins?

If we look at the Old Testament, David dressed in sackcloth and ashes as a sign of atonement and

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NATHAN REBUKING DAVID FOR HIS SIN

was excoriated by Nathan.  But it was a sign.  His atonement included much more than making a fashion statement.  David fasted.  He dealt more justly with his people, especially those whom he had offended.  He offered the animal sacrifice prescribed in the law.  Above all, he prayed.  Many of the psalms are the product of David’s intense life of penitential prayer.  David has become the model penitential man for the Jewish and Christian people.

 

Another personality that jumps out at us as a model penitent is John the Baptist.  The New Testament tells us that he came dressed in animal skins and ate bugs.  Yuck!  He preached conversion from sin.  His fight against sin cost him his head when he pointed out that Herod was living in an adulterous relationship with his sister-in-law.  David and John are still relevant penitent models.

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JOHN REBUKING HEROD ANTIPAS

David teaches us that atonement for sin goes beyond, “I’m sorry.”  There are consequences that the responsibly contrite person must assume.  This was the king who walked through his kingdom in sackcloth and ashes, dressed as a pauper instead of royal robes.  This was the king who humbled himself before his people admitting that he had sinned against God and against man.  He tried to do something to make it up to both God and man.  David understood and taught that true penance must cost us something and that it should offer a gift to God and man; but it had to be a gift that came from the penitent’s heart, not from his wallet.

John, on the other hand, had no sin for which to atone.  But he knew that many people around him needed to atone for sin.  He did penance for those who didn’t do penance for themselves.   Essential to a penitent life is to bear witness to the Truth.  John proclaims,

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“Behold the Lamb of God, and I must decrease so that he can increase.”  By decreasing, John, like David before him, surrenders the glory that comes from attention and admiration and directs it to God.

Our life should be an on-going Lent.  But during the Great Lent, 40 days before Easter, let us be truly sorry for our sins.  David and John are our models of penance.  We must present ourselves to the world, not in the best possible light, but as we really are, men and women who struggle with human weakness and sin, one hour at a time. True penance reaches out to those around us, especially those who are most in need of our compassion, the man and woman involved in abortion, the adolescent who is rebelling out of control, the neighbor who has lost a loved one, lost a job or is in deep financial crisis.  The person whom we fear is also worthy of our love and prayer, especially those who engage in acts of terrorism, those who molest children, or those who abuse their spouses.

In our family, there is always the one person who is the thorn in the side.  We must have the courage of

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THE INEVITABLE THORN

John and denounce his or her sin.  But we must also have the humility of David and admit that we too are sinners. Finally, let us not forget to proclaim the Truth.  God forgives and embraces a humble man.  Humility is being who we are in the sight of God.  Nothing else.

 

Published in: on March 2, 2017 at 12:23 AM  Leave a Comment