Who said that you have to like the Pope?


Saint Pius XI found this article to be very helpful and supportive of what I presented in an earlier post, “Under Whose Authority “

Apparently, I’m not the only one who is noticing that people are not making a distinction between what they like and what they don’t like but must learn to live with.

When I was growing up I hated almost every rule that my father imposed on us.  As far as I was concerned, he was a totalitarian despot.  I’ll let you in on a little secret.  I had no idea what a “totalitarian despot” meant.  But I had read the term in a social studies book in school and it sounded like an appropriate label for my dad.

As the years passed and I transitioned from a child to an adult, I came to realize that my father was just a very conservative man from a different generation.  The truth of the matter was that nothing that he imposed on us did any harm to our bodies, mind or souls.  Some of his rules and statements were arbitrary and others were right on the money.  As I became an adult, I jettisoned that which was arbitrary and incorporated into my script that which was truth.

The same applies the pope and others in the hierarchy.  Many times, just like our parents, they say things that are right on the money, but we don’t like what we’re hearing.  That does not mean they’re wrong.  Other times they say things using a language that is different, one that we’re not used to.  That does not mean that they’re wrong.  It simply means that we have to pay close attention to the nuances.  Finally, they may even say things that sound silly to us or not consistent with what came before.  That does not mean that they’re wrong either.  It means that they are speaking to a different generation, at a different time in history, using a different language, and building on what came before, not denying it.

If we don’t understand, it’s like not understanding our fathers or mothers.  We have to learn to respect the person and the office.  The rest is a matter of biting the bullet.  How many people would belittle their parents with such labels as “modernist, apostate, heretic, infidel, devil incarnate” and more, because the parent does not seem to tow the line with what we believe our parents should be saying or doing, in matters of home management, discipline and even faith formation of the children?

I remember that my father was a twice a year mass attendant.  It was not until my mother converted that he started to attend mass every Sunday.  My mom was a formidable woman.  If she said “We’re going to mass,” we were going to mass.  No discussions.  Having said that, I wouldn’t dare place my father on the stand and accuse him of being any of those things that some people attach to the Holy Father.  Respect and love do not depend on being right or being lovable.  Respect and love are a choice that we make to treat every man and woman as Christ did.  Let us never forget that even though Pilate was wrong, he was given authority from above to judge and execute Jesus.  Jesus acknowledged that authority.  He was not a fan of Pilate, but he was a loyal Son of the Father.

We too must learn to live in the Church as loyal sons of the Father.

One last note, this is not an attempt to bash Traditionalist Catholics or the Traditionalist movement.  There are many Catholics in the movement who are very holy people and exercise great self-control when they don’t like something and know how to speak with firmness and respect.  They are to be admired and applauded.

Some of you may like this article.  I thank Scott Eric Alt for sharing it.

 

Published in: on January 28, 2016 at 2:20 PM  Comments (1)  

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One CommentLeave a comment

  1. Respect and love are a choice that we make to treat every man and woman as Christ did.


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